Landscapes and biodiversity are protected

The Council protects open space, landscape and biodiversity through parks and reserves, covenants, sites of ecological significance, consents, land, waterways and coastal restoration programmes.

Ecosystems and indigenous biodiversity are protected

Biodiversity describes the variety of life within and between different indigenous/native ecosystems, species and genes.  Biodiversity is a fundamental part of New Zealand's unique landscape, wellbeing and economic wealth.;

Key points

  • Over 90% of Christchurch resident think that the work the Council does to protect and enhance biodiversity in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula is important or very important.
  • Since 1983, 900 hectares of land has been protected through Queen Elizabeth 2 covenants, and an additional 418ha had been covenanted by the Banks Peninsula Conservation trust to 2013.  In addition, 1291ha of land has been purchased by the CCC, DOC and NZ Forest Restoration Trust to protect and enhance biodiversity between 2009 and 2016.
  • The area of indigenous vegetation in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula has increased by 35 hectares since 1996 to a total of 16,267ha at 2012.  Most of this increase has been in broad-leafed indigenous hardwoods, and manuka and kanuka.  Matagouri and grey scrub has declined by 16%.
  • Half of residents are dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with the state of the rivers in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula, however only 12% and 15% are dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with the state of the coastlines and harbours respectively.
  • Generally, 60% of residents are satisfied or very satisfied with the state of the native bush and forests in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula in 2016.

Importance of Council protecting and enhancing Biodiversity

Importance of CCC protecting and enhancing Biodiversity

Source: Life in Christchurch Survey(external link)


Area of QE2 covenants

Area of QE2 covenants graph

Source: QE2 Covenants


Indigenous land cover

Source: Land cover database


Satisfaction with the State of Christchurch Rivers

Source: Life in Christchurch Survey(external link)


Satisfaction with Condition of Harbours and the Coastline

Satisfaction with Condition of Harbours and the Coastline graph

Source:  Life in Christchurch Survey(external link)


Satisfaction with Condition of Native bush and forests

Satisfaction with Condition of Native bush and forests graph

Source: Life in Christchurch Survey(external link)


More information

Indigenous habitats and species are enhanced

The higher the quality of our land, water and coast, the higher the quality of our animal and plants health.  The higher the quality of our animals and plant health, the higher the quality of our food, human health, wellbeing and quality of life.  

The area of significant indigenous vegetation on Banks Peninsula has increased since the 1970's (<5%) to 2010 (<20%), and with ongoing community support is likely to increase further.  The Canterbury earthquake may have increased the area of wetlands in Christchurch, and the rebuild of Christchurch City may result in the decrease of dry land ecosystems due to the demand for quarrying.  Rapid changes in Christchurch City are create opportunities and risk for the City's future.  

Key points

  • Since 2000, there has been over 300,000 native plants planted on the Port Hills as part of the Council's revegetation programme.  This is an average of around 19,000 plants per year.  
  • Ongoing plant pest control work on the Port Hills and Banks Peninsula has averaged just over 800ha per year since 2011.  In the last three years, this has been over 1000 hectares.  
  • The ecosystem health of the City's rivers and streams can be measured by looking at the quality of the macroinvertibrate living in the waterway.  Many of the river and none of the sites on the Heathcote River having QMCI values above guidelines.  Catchments with non urban areas tend to have better ecosystem health with the Otakaikino having over 60% of sites meeting the guidelines.  

Revegetation planting on the Port Hills 

Revegetation planting on the Port Hills

Source: Christchurch City Council Rangers


Port Hills & Banks Peninsula controlled for plan pests

Port Hills & Banks Peninsula controlled for plan pests

Source: Christchurch City Council Rangers


Ecological health of city rivers

Source: Christchurch City Council 5 yearly rivers ecology surveys graph

 


More information

  • CCC Aquatic Ecology Monitoring:  These surveys include assessments of riparian and in-stream habitat, aquatic plants and algae, aquatic insects and fish. The results are presented in reports that assess the condition of the waterway based on relevant guidelines, as well as any changes over time.
  • Biodiversity: The Council protects open space, landscape and biodiversity through parks and reserves, covenants, sites of ecological significance, consents, land, waterways and coastal restoration programmes.
  • A site of Ecological Significance is an area that has been assessed for its high biodiversity value.  Of about 680 sites, 105 have been surveyed an scheduled in the replacement District Plan.  The purpose of rules is to provide certainly as to which parts of a property are subject to vegetation clearance rules and will not impact on land management activities that support biodiversity.
  • State of the Lake(external link) [PDF 3.1MB]: Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere is one of New Zealand's most important wetland systems.  It is of cultural, natural, historic, recreational and commercial importance to many people.

Landscapes and natural features are protected

The landscape and natural features are an integral component of the natural environment.

They reflect the interconnectivity of environmental processes and human activity over time. Christchurch has various landscapes and natural features that provide a unique character and identity for the city.

Key points

  • From 2005 to 2016, residents' satisfaction with the condition of waterways has declined from 73% to 51%. Dissatisfaction has increased from 7% to 30%.
  • Nearly 80% of residents were satisfied with the state of Christchurch's native bush, forests, nature reserves and open green spaces in 2012. 8% of residents were dissatisfied in 2012. 

Satisfaction with waterways

Satisfaction with waterways graph

Source: Christchurch City Council General Satisfaction Survey(external link)


Satisfaction with natural environment

Source: Christchurch City Council General Satisfaction Survey(external link)


More information: 

  • The Port Hills:(external link) The Port Hills are a 12 million-year-old remnant of the Lyttelton volcano crater. Wind, rain, sun, ice and snow have eroded the crater over the last 8 million years, to what can be seen today.
  • Coastal Erosion and Inundation:(external link) Coastal inundation is when normally dry, low-lying coastal land is flooded by the sea. It is primarily caused by severe weather events along the coast, estuaries and adjoining rivers.